Travel

What Aeroplane Safety Instructions Miss Out

Airplane Flight Wing flying to Travel on Vacation

Airplane Flight Wing flying to Travel on Vacation (Photo credit: epSos.de)

I recently read an insightful article on Yahoo! which detailed some safety precautions on a plane journey.  The British Airways Safety Awareness Course allows you to spend a day taking a similar version of the training course which flight crews have to take annually.

Here are the top 3 things that you may not have known about being safe whilst flying:

Life Vests:

Some pretty frightful stuff here. Imagine (God forbid) that your plane is about to free fall into the ocean and you’re scavenging at the bottom of your seat hunting for a life vest jacket that ought to be there, but clearly isn’t. That picture shouldn’t be right, right? This course of events could happen though as what we are not told is that careless passengers sometimes steal the life vests! The cabin crew do check every morning to make sure each seat has their allocated life vest, however, if a flight is making various stops per day then someone could easily steal one in the morning and the crew would be none the wiser.

Oxygen Masks:

We’re constantly told that we have to put on our own oxygen masks before helping anyone else out. There is a simple explanation for this that they miss out in the manuals: you would only have 15 to 20 seconds during a cabin decompression, when all the oxygen is sucked out of the plane and your lungs, before you would enter a deranged state where you would be unable to remember what you had to do. This makes a hell of a lotta sense as to why you should not help someone else first as by the time you have put on your neighbours mask, you wouldn’t be able to save yourself from passing out in 30 to 45 seconds time.

Brace Position:

Right, so we understand that the brace position is when we put our hands on our heads and we lean forward, but have you ever paid attention to what your hands are doing in the safety brochure? What we are meant to do is put one hand (preferably the one you write with) under the other. This is because it wouldn’t be that useful if both of your hands got damaged if an object fell on you, so if you can protect one this means you would be able to unbuckle your seatbelt.

What safety measure did you not know they left out of the manuals?

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